A Picture Book-inspired Poetry and Writer's Notebook Lesson
Focus Trait: SENTENCE FLUENCY Support Trait: IDEA DEVELOPMENT

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Parody Poems

a November/December poetry contest sponsored by WritingFix and the NNWP


Student Writer Instructions:

Jon Scieszka is pretty brilliant!  In his collection of poems, Science Verse, the author writes about scientific topics in a very unique way!  He borrows the rhythm from many famous poems (and songs), and he writes about science using their poetic structure.  This is an intelligent way to explore a topic uniquely with writing, and it shows great respect to the poet whose work he is impersonating.

Today you'll be writing a poem in a similar way, but with topics that are interesting to you.  You can write about scientific topics, like Scieszka does, but you also can write about any topic using this technique.

The first step is to find a famous poem with a rhythm that can be easily impersonated.  You might have a favorite poem in mind for this assignment, but if you don't, just press the first button below to search through some of our favorite (and famous) poems that can be easily impersonated.  If you don't know the poems that are mentioned, you can find them on-line by searching the Poetry Treasure Chest link beneath the first button.

When you've chosen your poem, write it (or some of it) in the left-hand column of the graphic organizer your teacher will give you.  Count and record the number of syllables in each line of the original poem.  When you write your own poem that impersonates this poem on the right-hand side, be sure your lines match the number of syllables from the original poem.

Finally, if you haven't done so already, choose a topic to write your poem about.  Choose a topic that you love enough and know well enough to have fun with.  The second button below might give you ideas for fun topics to write about.

Interactive Choices for Writing:

If you're struggling to start, click the buttons below for some ideas that might inspire you to launch your piece of writing.

     

First choose a famous poem with rhythm that you can impersonate:

   


(It's okay to come up with your own famous poem, if you have a better idea.)

You can find and print the famous poem you choose on-line at: 
Poetry Treasure Chest


Next, choose a topic you can base your poem on:

   

 
(It's okay to come up with your own topics for this activity, if you think of a better idea.)  .


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