blog stats
HistoryFix: George vs George...Exploring Characteristics of a Leader
 

A Writing Across the Curriculum Lesson from HistoryFix
Historical Topic: American Revolution Students Write: a "report card" and acrostic poem

Navigating WritingFix & HistoryFix:

WritingFix Homepage

HistoryFix Homepage

Writing Across the Curriculum Homepage

________________

Navigating this lesson:

Lesson Overview and Resources

Student Writing Samples from this Lesson

George and George:
exploring two sides of the American Revolution

This writing across the curriculum lesson was created by Nevada teacher Christy Hodge.

Christy considers this history lesson to be appropriate for students in grades 3-6.


Lesson Overview:

Objectives/Overview: The students will determine and analyze characteristics of both King George III and George Washington. The student will learn about important events of the American Revolution and decisions made by both leaders. The students will make a report card and an acrostic poem for both King George III of England and George Washington to determine the leadership roles that both of these men played in the road to the American Revolution. The students will determine whether or not King George was a royal brut, as said by many, and whether or not George Washington was a traitor. Giving the students facts about the characteristics through the reading of George vs. George, the students will determine which leader had the best qualities.

Time Needed: five 90-minute class sessions.

Writing skills (traits) to stress while teaching this lesson:

  • Idea Development (writing with a clear, central idea or theme in mind; putting researched ideas into one's own words)
  • Voice (conveying passion towards the message of the writing or the topic; making decisions based on awareness of audience)

Background Information:

In the era leading up to the American Revolution, England passed many acts that greatly affected the colonists living in Colonial America. King George III of England imposed higher taxes, limited trade and power of the colonial governments, and forced the colonist to house British troops along with many other acts. King George III found these to be reasonable, as he was in control of the colonies.

The colonists wanted to be free from England and thought these acts were unreasonable. These acts caused disruption throughout the colonies and lead to war. The war was lead by General George Washington. The war would lead us to the birth of our nation.

George Washington was born February 22, 1732 and died December 14, 1799. He was a commander in Chief and became the President of the United States.

King George III was born June 4, 1738 and died January 29,1820- He was the King of England and the rest of the British Empire, including the American Colonies.


Materials List:

  • George vs. George: The Revolutionary War as Seen by Both Sides by Rosalyn Schanzer
  • 6 copies of the following pictures of the two Leaders. These primary source photographs of the two leaders will need to be cut up into four quadrants and placed into a manila envelope. Each envelope will contain puzzle pieces of the two leaders. You will need to do this for six total groups. Six envelopes each are containing the two leaders in pieces.
  • Two pieces of chart paper to hang up in the room. On one piece of chart paper write George Washington on the second piece of chart paper write King George III. Down the sides of the Chart paper write the following categories, giving plenty of space in between topics as this will be used for the report card.
    • Personal Qualities
    • Community Relations
    • Leadership Skills
    • Decision Making Skills
    • Fulfillment of expectations
    • Contributions to History
  • Primary source analysis worksheet
  • Report card planning worksheet

Teacher Instructions:

Day 1

The teacher will break the students into groups of six, or more if necessary. The teacher will begin by giving each group the pictures of the two leaders that have been cut into puzzle pieces and placed in a manila envelope.

The group will put the photos together like a puzzle. Once the group has completed the puzzle of the two leaders the students will each need to answer a photograph analysis worksheet about the two leaders.

The students will glue the photos together.

The teacher will hold a class discussion asking the students who these two men are and discuss the findings and questions from the analysis worksheet.

The teacher will then hang the chart papers for the two leaders at the front of the room.

The teacher will only give the students this information before beginning the read aloud to confirm their findings from the photo analysis work page:

George Washington, February 22, 1732-December 14, 1799. He was a Commander in Chief and became the President of the United States. King George III, June 4, 1738-January 29, 1820. He was the King of England and the rest of the British Empire, including the American Colonies.

Day 2

The teacher will begin the read aloud George vs. George: The Revolutionary War as Seen by Both Sides written by Rosalyn Schanzer, pages 8-31. As the teacher reads each chapter, the teacher will stop and ask the kids to fill in the traits under the headings of the chart paper. One chart is about George Washington and one is about King George. For Example: Under Personal qualities the students would list things such as the leader's hair color, marriage, age, etc.

 Day 3

The teacher will continue the read aloud George vs. George, pages 32-57. As the teacher reads each chapter, the teacher will stop and ask the kids to fill in the traits under the headings of the chart paper. The chart paper should be filled with qualities of both leaders by the end of day 3.

Day 4

Inspired by the "Wacky Report Card" ideas, found in Barry Lane's wonderful book 51 Wacky We-Search Reports, the teacher will have the students give each leader a Report Card based on the information given throughout the read aloud and that posted on the chart paper. The students will give a grade and write in comments (in a teacher's voice) as to why they were given that grade. For Example: The students may give George Washington an A under Organization and Planning. The comment might be "George does a fine job of training his men to go through rough terrain at night." Each comment should have at least two to three fact-based examples as to why the grade was given.

Day 5

The students will write an acrostic poem about King George and George Washington. The acrostic poem will be called George. The students will write a separate poem for each man. The students' poems will convey character traits about the men that have been learned from the read aloud, or the information from the class discussion and facts written on the chart paper. When the students are finished, the teacher will have the students read them to each other. The students will have to guess whether the poem was about King George or George Washington based on the information given from the poem.

 

 

 


WritingFix Homepage HistoryFix Homepage  Writing Across the Curriculum Homepage
 Student Writing Samples for this Lesson

© WritingFix. All rights reserved.