A Word Game for Kids from WritingFix
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Teachers sharing back!

Do you have a clever way you help your students connect with using better nouns in writing? Something better than a worksheet? Consider sharing it with us by clicking here.

 

Welcome, Young Writers!

The Noun Game for Kids

learning about specific nouns while writing an original story


A giraffe is a noun. So is a zoo. So is a zookeeper. What else is a noun?


When done playing, click on the giraffe to return to the
WritingFix for Kids Menu.

Hey, kids....can you write a story based on three interesting nouns? Click the three buttons below to find out!

                          

If you accidentally go past a noun you liked, hover over the noun you don't want, and use the right-button on your mouse to "undo" your extra press of the button. It really works!


Shared Student Samples from this Prompt:
At WritingFix, we've been safely publishing & celebrating student writers since 2007.

The Cat and the Box
by Carolyn, first grade writer

Three-noun prompt:
a cat, a box, and a factory

Once there was a black cat. His favorite place to be was an old pumpkin box and he lived in a food factory. Every night he would go and sleep in his old pumpkin box.

But then one night he went and slept in his box and he got trapped in his box. Then in the morning, the factory noticed the closed box and they thought, "This must be some kind of food or something." They put it in a bigger box, and it got shipped away.

Then it went to another place. It was a much nicer house. The people found the little kitty and they owned it. It had a much happier time. The end.

An Adventure
by Chris, second grade writer

Three-noun prompt:
a man, a castle, and a diamond

Once there was a man who found a dark and gloomy castle but he still went inside it.

In the dungeon, he found a diamond. It was in a chest and he accidentally sprang the booby traps. The booby traps were dangerous but he was smart.

He escaped safely with the diamond and had a happy life. He became rich and famous after his adventure.

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Share back with WritingFix and you could earn a classroom resource from NNWP:
What Mentor Texts could Strengthen this Lesson?
Suggest a mentor text review for the following essential question:

Hey teachers! What mentor text would you use to teach younger writers to carefully choose precise and interesting noun while writing? Click here to tell us the name of the mentor text, to share a brief description of the text, and to explain how you'd use the book to inspire better writing from your students. If we feature your idea at this page, you'll earn a resource for your classroom!

Share a Mentor Text and Noun Activity: I always share from Brian Cleary's picture book A Mink, a Fink, a Skating Rink: What Is a Noun? before, during, and after students are using the Noun Game for Kids. Just from the book's title words, you can tell what types of nouns this book shares with reader: very precise ones. The interactive buttons above give some specific noun choices, but I find that repetitive reading of Cleary's book helps students choose original nouns on which to base their stories. Remember, it's okay for them to select a noun for the stories that the students don't receive from the buttons. When they ask, "Can I use [a noun they think up on their own] instead of [a noun from the buttom prompt above]?" always tell them "Yes!"--unless it's an unspecific noun they want to substitute. If they offer an unspecific noun--like guy or lady or animal--probe deeper with questions like "What kind of guy do you mean?"

--Corbett Harrison, Nevada teacher

 

Share back with WritingFix and you could earn a classroom resource from NNWP:
What Lessons Would Strengthen Noun Stories?
Share an activity you'd use before or after your students write:

Hey teachers: What mini-lessons/pre-writing activities would you present to teach younger writers to carefully choose precise and interesting nouns for their writing? Click here to briefly share a technique you use to strengthen your students' awareness of nouns and pronouns.
No activity ideas posted yet for this writing prompt on nouns...not yet! Be the first to share an idea, and we will send you a copy of one of the NNWP Print Guides as our way of saying THANKS! See some example ideas posted at our Adjective Game for Kids Prompt.

 


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