A Word Game for Kids from WritingFix
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Teachers sharing back!

Do you have a clever way you help your students understand how to use stronger visual details in writing? Something better than a worksheet? Consider sharing it with us by clicking here.

 


Welcome, Young Writers!

The Setting Game for Kids

describing a place with memorable details

(This prompt was developed at an inservice class by Nevada teacher Margo Sistek.)


What interesting details can you use to describe a place?

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Write a story that happens

                                                   


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Share back with WritingFix and you could earn a classroom resource from NNWP:
What Mentor Texts could Improve this Lesson?
Suggest a mentor text review for the following essential question:

Hey teachers! What mentor text would you use to teach younger writers to carefully choose memorable and thoughtful details in a story about a special or interesting place? Click here to tell us the name of the mentor text, to share a brief description of the text, and to explain how you'd use the book to inspire better writing from your students. If we feature your idea at this page, you'll earn a resource for your classroom!

Share a Mentor Text and Idea Development Activity: When trying to get young writers excited about writing about places, I often share Barbara Cooney 's picture book Roxaboxen, which combines reality with imagination in exploring a place that's important to children. Before asking students to write about a setting, share the book. While they are writing, encourage them to describe things that are real in their own stories, but not to be afraid to use their imaginations, like in the story Roxaboxen.

--Corbett Harrison, Reno, Nevada


Share back with WritingFix and you could earn a classroom resource from NNWP:

What Lessons Strengthen Detail Choice?
Share an activity you'd use before or after your students write:

Hey teachers: What mini-lessons/pre-writing activities would you present to teach younger writers to "paint pictures on their readers' minds?" Click here to briefly share a technique you use to strengthen your students' awareness of the kind of visual details that improve writing. The model below shows the kind of good ideas we're hoping teachers will share with us.

I use old greeting cards or calendars that have very obvious differences for example one with Christmas trees, one with monkeys, one with little children.  Then I break up the class into teams to write a description of one of the pictures.  The team that writes the best description wins a point.  As students become better at this skill, I make the pictures more and more similar, for example all mountain photos.  Students will start to see that the clearer their description and the more details they use the more likely their team is to score points.

-- Stacy Dibble, Worthington, Minnesota

(Stacy chose a Going Deep with Compare and Contrast Thinking Guide as her gift for sharing this.)


Got your own technique for teaching details. Click here to share!

 


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